Preparedness Resources

Preparedness Resources

Preparedness is the knowledge that we can, as individual households, take steps before an emergency to be prepared for it. There are many levels of preparedness, and many aspects to being prepared.

 

EMP Preparedness

for Cities, Towns, and Communities
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Given current unpreparedness of National and State governments, if EMP event happens today, your city, town or community, and you personally, will be on your own.

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Do not wait on Washington or your state government to solve this problem. You as communities and individuals should start preparing for EMP event now.

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Plan should assume EMP will blackout electric grid for weeks or months, consequently: no water, no communications, no transportation, food scarcity, societal breakdown.

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Recommendations that follow are mostly universally applicable to any protracted emergency situation. So EMP preparedness is also preparedness for any protracted emergency situation, such as would result from for example: failure or sabotage of the critical infrastructures, WMD attack, massive cyber-attack, major storms or other natural disasters.

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Water: Bottled water, filter system, chlorine tablets, public "well" at least 1-week supply, the longer the better.

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Food: Canned is best. Freeze dried, powders, grains, other preserves that come in plastic or cardboard packages should be stored in metal or other containers resistant to rodents, temperature, humidity. Store seeds for planting. Farming plan.

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Emergency Generators: Should be provided for organizations vital to public safety--police, fire, hospital. Leave generators unconnected until needed. Perhaps supplement with solar or alternative energy sources. Diesel-electric locomotive.

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Fuel: Fill storage casernes for existing emergency generators, for police and fire and hospital vehicles. Change fire codes if necessary. At least 1-week fuel supply, the more the better.

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Transportation: Most vehicles likely to survive EMP, except in worst case scenario. Underground parking, metal sheds, metalicized insulation will provide some protection from EMP. Manual pumps at gas stations. Fire vehicles should have pumps not dependent on working hydrant system.

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Communications: Landline phones, internet, and cell towers will be disabled. Emergency communications plan--walkie talkies, short-range fire and police radios likely to be OK. Community emergency radio. Plan to utilize local ham radio operators.

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Community Shelter: At least one public building, usually a school is best, should be survivable with heating and cooling, emergency food and water supply, to shelter at least the most vulnerable part of the community (the aged and infants) from extreme weather.

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Community Planning: Plan for a self-sufficient community. Encourage everyone to participate in planning, contribute ideas, volunteer skills. Start by accounting the community's human and material resources.

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Rugged Individualism: Encourage and support.

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Be Proactive: Tell your representatives in Washington DC (and your state) to do their jobs. To get started, visit www.GuardTheGrid.com and www.SHIELDact.com. To learn more, visit www.EMPactRadio.org.

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Click here to download the PDF format of the info above to distribute in your community.

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EMPact America encourages everyone to take time to assess how prepared you are for emergencies and natural disasters. Use these resources to review (and improve upon, if needed) your plans for your household, where you work or go to school, and in your community organizations.

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We encourage everyone to take steps to become more prepared.
spacer Here are some ideas on how you can start:

  1. Click here to access a copy of a basic checklist you can use to help you become more prepared.
  2. Try creating your own preparedness list.
  3. Listen to EMPact Radio for special preparedness podcasts. Simply go to www.EMPactRadio.org to listen.

This page is a starter resource for our members to find ways to be prepared, and is not intended to be the definitive preparedness resource, but a resource of resources--a growing collection of web sites and organizations dedicated to preparedness.

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Web Site Resources:

Ready.gov - the federal government's main web site for being ready

Ready.gov's emergency-specific pages:

Hurricane info: www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/hurricanes.html

Blackout info: www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/blackout.html

Earthquake info: www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/earthquakes.html

Flood info: www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/floods.html

Popular Preparedness Web Sites:

SurvivalBlog.com

TheSurvivalistBlog.com

TheSurvivalMom.com

Pioneer Living

Survival Topics

 

Preparedness Podcasts:

EMPact Radio Episode PVP#23 - with James Wesley Rawles

EMPact Radio Episode PVP#36 - with James Wesley Rawles

TheSurvivalPodcast.com

PrepperPodcast.com

ThePreparednessPodcast.com

spacerEMPact America's Preparedness Podcast on EMPact Radio

 

 

Video Resources:

Ready.gov's instructional videos: www.ready.gov/america/about/instructional_index.html

Total Self-Reliance's videos: www.youtube.com/user/TotalSelfReliance

RoknRandy's instructional videos: www.youtube.com/user/roknrandy

Preparedness Resources for Long-Term Power Outages

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Below are links to some items or resources that have been mentioned in the Preparedness Podcast regarding personal preparedness and/or local government preparedness. These are just some sample items to think about. Please research any purchases carefully, and shop around. We do not endorse or guarantee any products or information. All info is provided "as is." Also, keep in mind much of what you (and your town) will need is planning – it is important to secure and use your existing resources.

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Also, learning skills can be more important than having supplies, so consider learning new skills and practicing them before you need them.

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Below are some other ideas and items you should be able to find on www.readymaderesources.com:

  • Galvanized metal garbage cans for backup equipment storage – line with non conductive material, should not touch metal.
  • HAM Radios
  • "Hand cranked devices"
  • Consider stocking up on fuel (fire starters and waterproof matches)
  • Back-up power source that does not require fuel, not connected to the Grid. (wind and solar)

Suggestions?

Are you familiar with other preparedness resources? Please email webmaster@empactamerica.org with any suggestions you have.